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Arrillaga Alumni Center: 326 Galvez Street, Stanford, CA 94305
Sponsored by: Netronome, AT&T, Cisco, Hewlett Packard Enterprise & Barefoot Networks
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Tuesday, May 24 • 4:00pm - 4:20pm
PISCES: A Programmable, Protocol-Independent Software Switch

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Virtualized data-centers use software hypervisor switches to steer packets to and from virtual machines (VMs). The switch frequently needs upgrading and customization---to support new protocol headers or encapsulations for tunneling or overlays, to improve measurement and debugging features, and even to add middlebox-like functions. Software switches are typically based on a large body of code, including kernel code. Changing the switch is a formidable undertaking requiring domain mastery of network protocol design and developing, testing, and maintaining a large, complex code-base. In this talk, we argue that changing how a software switch forwards packets should not require intimate knowledge of its implementation. Instead, it should be possible to specify how packets are processed and forwarded in a high-level domain-specific language (DSL) such as P4, then compiled down to run on the underlying software switch. We present PISCES, a software switch that is not hard-wired to specific protocols, which eases adding new features. We also show how the compiler can analyze the high-level specification to optimize forwarding performance. Our evaluation shows that PISCES performs comparably to Open vSwitch, a hardwired hypervisor switch, and that PISCES programs are about 40 times shorter than equivalent Open vSwitch programs. 

*This presentation also has an associated demo: PISCES: A Programmable, Protocol-Independent Software Switch

Speakers
avatar for Muhammad Shahbaz, Princeton University

Muhammad Shahbaz, Princeton University

Muhammad Shahbaz is a third year PhD student in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. His research focuses on the application of software-defined networking (SDN) in campus, enterprise and wide-area networks, SDN performance optimization, network testing and language abstractions for programmable hardware. Previously, he worked as a research assistant at the University of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory on the CTSRD and... Read More →



Tuesday May 24, 2016 4:00pm - 4:20pm
McCaw Hall - Presentations

Attendees (1)